Fall in love with God and render yourself bulletproof | Worship

By Gordy Arlin, a Bahá’í of Mukilteo | Mar 05, 2014

In my 20s as a brand new Christian, I was pleasantly startled that God wanted a personal relationship with me, and I was amazed by the flood of positive results I was enjoying subsequent to my initial halting experiments in the realms of prayer and of extending forgiveness to others.

But I was perplexed by some of the Bible's instructions that I was called to pray every moment of my life:

"Pray without ceasing. In every thing give thanks." (1 Thessalonians 5:17-18)

"...(M)en ought always to pray, and not to faint." (Luke 18:1)

"...(W)ithout ceasing I have remembrance of Thee in my prayers night and day." (2 Timothy 1:3)

This 'always' thing seemed counter-intuitive to me. When was I to, for instance, earn a living? Mow the lawn? Visit with Mom and Dad?

I find these same exhortations echoed in the Bahá’í Writings:

"Man must live in a state of prayer."

"...(C)ontinually supplicate... continually pray to God."

"Prayer and supplication... for the whole day with high ideals and supreme sanctity and calmness."

"Know that nothing will benefit thee in this life save supplication and invocation unto God, service in His vineyard, and, with a heart full of love, be in constant servitude unto Him."

"One must live in a perennial attitude of prayer."

So, again, how do I balance the all-consumingness of these commands with other scriptural commands that I, for instance, take an education? Earn a living? Be social?

How do I reconcile: "It is incumbent upon thee to turn unto the kingdom of God and to pray, supplicate and invoke during all times" with painting the house and bathing the dogs?

My best guess for the answer to this question involves an analogy:

Return with me to those thrilling days of yesteryear. Prowl the dusty canyons of your mind and make a withdrawal from your memory banks to savor once again the unique flavor of falling deeply in love for the first time.

Recall how the experience rendered you bulletproof:

Stub your toe? No problem: I'm in love! Big final exams next week? Duck soup: I'm in love! Flat tire on a rainy night pre-cellphone era? Who cares? I'm tumbling in love and life is sweet!

Break your leg? Small change!: My love will bring me flowers and a kiss, and my leg will surely heal! World in chaos and turmoil exploding all around you? This is not good, I must do what I can; but I'll do it from a place of bliss because I'm remembering something wonderful that my love said to me last week, plus we're going dancing this Saturday night!

See how the amethyst glow of being deeply in love profoundly colored my perspective, altered my feelings about challenges, small and large?

My best guess is that we should fall in love with God with the kind of depth and all-consumingness of that 'first love'.

If we were to let ourselves be equally smitten with the Lord God, we would see all of our circumstances differently, through lenses of beautiful color, be constantly counting fully our blessings (magnificent boggling clockwork creation from nothingness! Unasked for independence and autonomy! Ability to find and cooperate with our Creator! Free will! Strawberry shortcake!) and having allowed ourselves to be so appropriately dazzled, we would be in a state of constant prayer, in an unending "THANK YOU!"

We are too close to our individual experiences of living for us to properly and correctly discern the unrequested flaming miracle that every moment is. Separate yourself. Choose to see it.

In closing, also from the Bahá’í Writings, God speaks to us in the first person:

"O Son of Light! Forget all save Me and commune with My Spirit. This is of the essence of My command; therefore turn unto it."

Comments (0)
If you wish to comment, please login.