Puget Sound through an artist’s eye

Oct 24, 2013
The Adopt A Stream Foundation and Snohomish County Parks present a special Streamkeeper Academy event: Tony Angell and “Puget Sound Through An Artist’s Eye” on Nov. 1.

The Adopt A Stream Foundation and Snohomish County Parks present a special Streamkeeper Academy event: Tony Angell and “Puget Sound Through An Artist’s Eye.”

It takes place at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1, in the Northwest Stream Center Auditorium in Snohomish County’s McCollum Park, 600-128th St. SE, Everett.

Puget Sound’s rich abundance of life from mammals to birds can be attributed to the fact that the region is far more than just a body of water.  Edged by an extraordinary rant of habitat, this region is visited and occupied year-round by species that are finely tuned to exploit the resources here that are necessary for their survival.

Birds are among the most obvious occupants of these communities, and witnessing their dynamic lives has been a source of inspiration for artist and naturalist Tony Angell.

For more than 50 years, Angell has used Puget Sound’s natural diversity as his artist’s palette.  On Nov. 1, he will share his art that illustrates his book, “Puget Sound Through An Artist’s Eye,” and describe the living system within  the Sound and share his observations and encounters with the species that make up the complex communities of the Sound’s rivers, tidal flats, islands, and beaches: the fledging flight of a young peregrine, an otter playfully herding a small red rockfish, the grasp of a curious octopus... and many more.

“It’s a privilege to have Tony Angell at the Northwest Stream Center,” says Adopt A Stream Foundation Director Tom Murdoch.

“Anyone who has interest in our region’s bird, mammal, and marine life – and artistic expression will really enjoy ‘Puget Sound Through An Artist’s Eye.’”

Reservation are required by calling the Adopt A Stream Foundation at 425-316-8592, $5 for members, $7 non-members.  There will be a book signing after the show.

Angell is an illustrator, sculptor, and author.  Angell has won numerous writing and artistic awards for his work, including the prestigious Master Wildlife Artist Award of the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum and the 2006 International Victoria and Albert Museum Illustration Grant Award.

His sculptural forms celebrating nature are to be found in public and private collections throughout the country.

In 2002, Angell retired as Washington State Director of Environmental Education after 30 years of service.

A devout conservationist, he received the Oak Leaf Award, the highest recognition given by the national office of The Nature Conservancy.

He is author of “Ravens, Crows, Magpies, and Jays and Owls” and lives in Seattle with his wife and two daughters.

More background on Tony and views of his art can be viewed from the following link:

http://www.tonyangell.net/.

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