Letters to the Editor

Jun 19, 2019

Political attacks on freedom

 

There is a threat to our democratic process skulking about in the dark in Mukilteo.  It is not immigration, a religion, a meddling foreign power or a political party; it is hatred and fear.

Hundreds of thousands of Americans of many origins since 1770 have died for the freedom that we have in this country to openly debate ideas and vote for or against those ideas.

Individuals embody these ideas while acting on the behalf of fellow citizens at the city, county, state or federal level.

As a nation we recently recognized the actions of our nonagenarians on the beaches in France as they stormed into the teeth of the most vicious mechanized warfare, soiled by the offal of their friends, to aid in the release of Europe from the grip of totalitarianism.

Our past several local election cycles have been marred by a movement that is akin to the brown shirted youth that terrorized the streets of Munich to suppress opposition as they grew to overwhelm a country.

It is a more polite movement than smashing windows and painting stars on storefronts, but it springs from the same well: anger, hatred, and intimidation.

Almost all of Mr. Zieve’s signs placed since Friday have been systematically defaced by a violent act with a blade.

In the last election, I watched a local woman pull a sign of his and toss it over a fence into a greenbelt.

When confronted, she said in a UK accent that he was “unAmerican.”

Similarly, many of Mr. Yoo’s signs have been uprooted and thrown to the ground. I would argue that such acts are “unAmerican.”

I do not know these candidates; I do not know if I will vote for them. I do know that they have the right to run for office in this city, to place political signage in public thoroughfares and to expect that their signs will be respected as a form of free political speech.

Those who disagree with them should argue with their own signage, campaigning and/or votes.

The crowning glory of our country is the freedom to disagree in public without the fear of arrest or disappearance of one’s self or one’s family. Those who are participating in these acts of political suppression have no value for a democratic republic and would be more at home in a totalitarian state.

If you see someone acting in such a manner, say something and stand up for your own freedom of speech and dissent. The next freedom removed may be one you value.

 

Chris Beard

Mukilteo

 

Making a difference

 

Congratulations to the high school students speaking out for free menstrual products in school bathrooms and to the Beacon for publishing their articulate letter.  (“Students deserve free menstrual products in school bathrooms” by Asley Duong, Jinyang (Alice) Zhang, and Ramya Arumilli, Mukilteo Beacon, June 12, 2019).

These days, student voices are leading the way in important areas like global warming, gun control, and equity issues. It is important to listen to them.

RESULTS (results.org) is listening, giving scholarships to 18-30 year olds called Real Change Scholars every year, and welcoming them to positions of leadership, in the process of ending hunger and poverty.

Each of us can be inspired by these students and use our voices in a way that works to change things for the better.

In this way, the number of deaths of children under five has been cut by over half in the last 30 years, deaths from tuberculosis, malaria, and AIDS have been cut by at least one third, and more than 100,000 people leave abject poverty every day.  So join the students, speak out to those who represent you, and be a part of making a better world!

 

Willie Dickerson

Snohomish

Comments (0)
If you wish to comment, please login.