Mukilteo Fire’s Brian Ouellette returns to the mound

By Brandon Gustafson | Apr 03, 2019
Courtesy of: Julie Moore Brian Ouellette, a 2004 Kamiak grad who now works for the Mukilteo Fire Department, throws out the ceremonial first pitch at Kamiak’s league opener Wednesday, March 27. Ouellette was a star pitcher for the Knights in the early 2000s.

It was a homecoming of sorts for Brian Ouellette.

Ouellette has spent most of his life in Mukilteo, attending Mukilteo Elementary, Olympic View Middle School, and graduating from Kamiak High School in 2004.

Ouellette was a standout pitcher for the Knights, setting many of the school’s pitching records and earning a scholarship to play ball at Gonzaga University in Spokane.

When he wound up for a pitch last Wednesday, March 27, there wasn’t an opposing player in the batter’s box, and there was no game on the line.

He wasn’t donning the Kamiak purple and white uniform – he was wearing shorts and a T-shirt.

Ouellette is now in his 30s, has a wife and three children, is a paramedic/firefighter with the Mukilteo Fire Department, and was throwing out the ceremonial first pitch before Kamiak’s first league game against Cascade High School.

Like with so many other promising pitching prospects, injuries to Ouellette’s throwing arm derailed his playing career at Gonzaga, and he ended up finishing his baseball career at Linfield College in Oregon before attending Central Washington University, where he received a degree in paramedicine and met his wife, Sarah, who works at Providence Hospital.

Ouellette started his career in emergency services in Wenatchee, where he was a paramedic for one and a half years. After that, he was a firefighter/paramedic in Sequim for four and a half years before returning home to Mukilteo to work for the Mukilteo Fire Department, also as a firefighter/paramedic. He has worked in Mukilteo for over three years now.

Ouellette’s boss played a role in getting him back on the Kamiak mound.

“The (Kamiak baseball) boosters came to us – they’re doing an ‘honoring local heroes’ thing each year, and last year was the (Mukilteo) Police Department,” he said. “It was Fire’s turn this year, and (Fire) Chief (Chris Alexander) gave me a call and asked me if I wanted to do it.”

Many of Ouellette’s favorite high school moments took place on that field, and he said he was excited at the invitation.

“It was a lot of fun. It brought back a lot of really good memories,” he said. “It was really fun to be back on the mound.”

One of those memories was during his sophomore year, where his team made a run to the state playoffs.

“That team, we had a ton of juniors, and I was one of a few sophomores. We were a really young team. We made it to state for the first time in school history, and that was so cool because we weren’t expected to do much that year.”

Ouellette said he was always interested in working for a fire department, and that a family member encouraged him to do a ride-along one day.

“That got me hooked,” he said.

Ouellette, like many Mukilteo Fire Department employees, splits time between Fire Station 25 in Harbour Pointe and Fire Station 24 in Old Town on Fifth Street.

Ouellette actually grew up on Fifth Street, across from Fire Station 24, and saw it get constructed.

“I think I was 5, and I stayed home from school with the chickenpox and I saw it start to get built,” Ouellette said.

Ouellette, who now lives near Forest Park in Everett with his wife and children, said he always wanted to end up working closer to his hometown, and luckily for him, an opening came up in Mukilteo.

“That was definitely a bonus,” he said. “I always wanted to move closer to home, and I got lucky. I tested well and got the job.

“It’s definitely a surreal thing to work in my hometown. It’s neat to give back this way.”

 

 

 

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